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INTRODUCING A NEW BOOK DESTINED TO BE A BUSINESS CLASSIC!

Madame Alexandra's Rules of Business: The Enduring Principles of Business Success


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MADAME ALEXANDRA'S RULES OF BUSINESS 

Reveals the Secrets of Business Success of a 19th Century Paris Madam

Learn about the Business Principles that Created One of Paris's Most Highly-Regarded Business Establishments, Frequented by the Powerful, the Wealthy and the Leading Lights of France's Arts and Sciences



NOW AVAILABLE! A BOOK FEATURING THE REMARKABLE ACCOUNT of the approach to business Madame Alexandra used to created a fortune of note.



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FOR TWO DECADES Alexandra Borodinskaya—known to her elegant clientele only as Madame Alexandra—ran Paris’s most highly regarded "maison close". 


Located on the same street as the Elysée Palace, the Faubourg Saint-Honoré, her establishment received the mighty, the clever, and the leading lights of France’s arts and sciences. 


It was said that wealth alone did not qualify one for admission, and to be refused at the door by the ever-formal portier was considered a greater humiliation for a man than to be overlooked by the host at the Elysée.


Ever secretive, Madame Alexandra remained an elegant mystery to her notable clients. Unlike many famous madams, there is no record of her ever having personally worked in her trade at any time during her life. 


She developed intimate relationships with many of France’s leading men but none ever suggested that she had been his mistress. 


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If she had lovers during her residence in Paris, she took their names to her grave. In fact very little was known about "le Numéro 23", the house on the Faubourg, until a British academic, Phillip Goodhue-Darling, procured a well-worn but finely bound early copy of Flaubert’s "Madame Bovary" from one of the booksellers along the Seine. 


What he found upon a closer examination of the book was that it contained only the first twenty pages of Flaubert’s masterpiece, the remainder of the pages having been substituted with an account simply entitled "Les confessions d’Alexandra: Le récit d’une affaire."


The French affaire does not translate as “affair” in English, but simply as “enterprise". Thus it is that Alexandra Borodinskaya gave us a remarkable account of those business principles she applied in amassing a fortune of note. 


At her death, at the advanced age of 92, after many years of a genteel retirement that saw her divide her time between her villa on the Lake of Geneva and her home on Cap d’Antibes, it came to light that she owned all of the odd-numbered properties between numbers 15 and 27 on the Faubourg Saint-Honoré—therefore, the entire side of the street for more than a quarter of a mile, a staggering fortune in real estate.


But for the curiosity of Professor Goodhue-Darling’s nephew, Madame Alexandra’s account might have been lost. The precocious youth had been forbidden unsuitable reading, which "Madame Bovary" would have been adjudged, so of course he directed his attention to the work as soon as he found it in his uncle’s study. 


The nephew, Kingsley Knight, was as disappointed as his uncle had been at discovering the premature end of Flaubert’s story, but unlike his uncle he read the substituted work through, believing he would eventually—he says—find the naughty bits, having taken affaire for affair. 


He did not find these but did retain the book in his possession and the work in his memory, and after founding two highly successful service companies in his twenties, he decided to make the rules he had applied available for publication.


Herewith, "Madame Alexandra’s Rules of Business".


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